Vintage Cookbook - Oatmeal Cookies

July 1, 2015

Cookies and milk.  Ice cream cookie sandwiches.  That delicious moment when you, as a child, would come into the house and the overwhelming aroma of freshly-baked cookies would hit you.  One of the best smells in the world is a warm cookie.  There are many fancy versions in a hundred different cookbooks.  However, one of my favorites has always been a good old-fashioned oatmeal cookie.  

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

I've tried many versions, but I thought I'd try one from a tried and true recipe book from the deco era - the Metropolitan Cook Book.  Published by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, it has reincarnated itself over the decades.  This version is probably from the 1930s (I can find no publishing date)
Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

The ingredients are simple:

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

You will need:

OATMEAL COOKIES
Recipe from the Metropolitan Life Cook Book

Ingredients:
1/2 cup fat (I used all butter, slightly softened)
1 cup sugar
2 beaten eggs
1/4 cup milk
2 cups oatmeal
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt

The recipe also mentions raisins, but I despise raisins.  Off of my list of ingredients they came.  The first step was to cream the butter and sugar together.  After that was accomplished, I added the eggs, one at a time, the milk, oatmeal, flour, soda, cinnamon and salt (that's right - you just throw it all in there.)

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

Once it is all beaten, it should look a bit like this.

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

Next, I scooped the dough using a cookie dough scoop onto a lined cookie sheet and into my preheated 350F degree oven they went.  Of course, there is no mention of how long to cook the cookies.  I started with 10 minutes, but because my oven is terrible at holding a true temperature, wound up cooking close to 13-15 minutes.  Just keep an eye on them and judge based on the particulars of your oven.  I like them with a little color on them.  They don't spread a whole lot.

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

Once you remove them from the oven, let them set a couple of minutes to firm up.  Then scoop onto a cooling rack to finish cooling off.

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

Voila!  A warm, soft cookie, not crunchy.

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

The next two photos are to show what they look like with varying scooping methods.  The top is my original cookie scoop version...

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

These two show what they look like if you roll the dough into a walnut-sized ball (left) or do the drop method with spoons (right.)  Just depends on how fussy you are about the look of your cookies.  If you insist on adding those pesky, insect-like mushy raisins (you can tell how much I love them), they will of course look a little different. If you love them, add 1 cup.

Vintage Oatmeal Cookie Recipe 1930s

OATMEAL COOKIES
Recipe from the Metropolitan Life Cook Book

Ingredients:
1/2 cup fat (I used all butter)
1 cup sugar
2 beaten eggs
1/4 cup milk
2 cups oatmeal
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup raisins (optional)

Cream the fat, add the sugar gradually and work until creamy.  Add the well beaten eggs, milk, oatmeal, flour, soda, cinnamon, salt, and the raisins (if you must).  Drop by teaspoonsful (or scoop with a cookie scoop or roll in the palms of your hands) on a buttered pan (or use a Silpat.)  Bake in a 350F oven for 13-15 minutes. Once removed from the oven, let them set for a couple of minutes to firm up and then scoop onto a wire rack to cool further.

If you're dying to try more vintage cookie recipes, you can sample my peanut butter balls (a.k.a. cookies - they're not balls, but that's what the book called them - scroll all the way down to the bottom). Hope you enjoy!

'Bye for Now,





Jessica Cangiano said...

Yum, yum and yum again! Of all the cookies that my mom (a wonderful home cook) made when I was little, (save maybe for some Christmas specialties) her oatmeal ones - which included both raisins and shredded coconut - were my favourite hands down.

♥ Jessica

Patricia Lynn said...

Jessica, I won't hold it against you if you like raisins. ;) I would love to see your mom's recipe!

Kate said...

Mmmmm, those sound good!

Patricia Lynn said...

They're pretty tasty, Kate. Very comforting.

tubby3pug said...

those look very tasty and what a great retro cookbook

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